Wednesday, September 5, 2018

On Nike.



Nike.

This is the same company that created a dri-fit hijab for Muslim women athletes. “Seeing” people is not a new thing for them.



Nope.



For those feeling conflicted about the “Just Do It” campaign? Know this: People REALLY like to matter. And if you and your loved ones get to live your lives every single day as the ones who consistently get to matter in this country by historical default? Or if you’re down with Kap and Nike but are among those who have the luxury of being able to voluntarily remain silent or indifferent on a whim because of your outward appearance? Thank your lucky stars.

For real.




After that, take a moment to wonder what it’s like to breathe an involuntary sigh of relief every single time your black husband or son makes it home after dark. Or to regard the millions of families like ours who have to regularly run through “the police drill” with their middle school sons at the dinner table—because it could literally be life or death someday if you don't.

So you have to start early.




Sigh. 



It’s so much deeper than shoes, man.






Oh—and for the record? I’m the proud wife of a Ranger-qualified United States Army Veteran who approves of this message.

Don’t have a full appreciation for what a U.S. Army Ranger is? I'd suggest you Google it.

Seriously. You should.

That's all.

***
Happy Wednesday.

2 comments:

  1. First- your family is so beautiful.
    I never take my privilege for granted. I probably do not even begin to realize how far that privilege extends but I sure do know it's there.
    I'm pretty blown away by Nike's ad campaign but I'm even more shocked (and horrified) by the negative reactions. What in hell is wrong with people?

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  2. And I am the mothered a black teenage son. My husband and I approve of this message as well. Just a wick share: my son was involved in a minor fender bender that he was at fault for. He had two other brown skin bites with him( one Hispanic one AA. The officer who was ver polite ran his license. His reply is what troubled me. He said” I ran you tag and see you don’t have a any pevious charges, that impressive”. The conversation continued about how lucky he was to have parents that let him drive such a nice car( it’s a BMW) Although he presented as nice, I couldn’t help thinking that his first thoughts were probably that these 3 brown boys had stolen this car and that my son probably had a record. He complemented my son for looking him in the eye when they spoke and firmly shaking his hand and how polite he was. ( We’ve had the conversation many times about how to respond to traffic stops and police)
    I was angry but concealed it because I knew that by saying anything the conversation could have changed abruptly.
    I wondered if my son had not been brown if his approach about his record and the vehicle that he was driving would have been the same. I wonder if he would have seemed so surprised that both of his parents showed up to the accident .
    No matter how nice they present, I still sense underlying apprehensions when my 6’6’ husband unfolded from his vehicle.
    I get why Kap kneels. I wish I didn’t, but I do and that makes me really sad.

    ReplyDelete

"Tell me something good. . . tell me that you like it, yeah." ~ Chaka Khan

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